RUB researchers make bio-based solar cell breakthrough

RUB researchers have developed a bio-based solar cell using cyanobacteria found in hot spr...

Researchers at Ruhr-Universitat Bochum have created a bio-based solar cell capable of generating a continuous electrical current of several nanowatts per sq cm. The new approach avoids damage to the tapped photosynthetic cells, an issue that has plagued previous attempts to harness nature’s “power plant.”..
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Where's your jetpack? It's underwater

The Underwater Jet Pack is designed to let users perform underwater acrobatics using forea...

Who wouldn’t like to fly around underwater? You can already sort of do so using devices such as the SeaBob, although you’re still basically just “along for the ride.” If SCP Marine Innovations’ Underwater Jet Pack reaches production, however, it looks like it should provide an experience much closer to that of being Aquaman.
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Ben Coxworthgizmag.com covers the full spectrum of emerging technologies, invention and innovation – from automotive to aerospace, from handhelds to supercomputers, from robotics to home automation, the site reports on all major announcements across more than 30 categories.Gizmag NewsWhere's your jetpack? It's underwaterhttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GizmagEmergingTechnologyMagazine/~3/ndvGx8pUNeU/http://feeds.feedburner.com/GizmagEmergingTechnologyMagazineGizmag Emerging Technology Magazine

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Cutting the cord: Gizmag's Top 10 off-grid homes

Gizmag's Top 10 off-grid homes

We’re big fans of off-grid homes here at Gizmag – and for good reason: an off-grid home frees the owner from the vagaries of unscrupulous energy giants, can potentially help reduce impact on the environment, and offers a greater self-sufficiency. Join us as we shine a light on 10 of our favorites.
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Adam Williamsgizmag.com covers the full spectrum of emerging technologies, invention and innovation – from automotive to aerospace, from handhelds to supercomputers, from robotics to home automation, the site reports on all major announcements across more than 30 categories.Gizmag NewsCutting the cord: Gizmag's Top 10 off-grid homeshttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GizmagEmergingTechnologyMagazine/~3/3-LQnYALUH8/http://feeds.feedburner.com/GizmagEmergingTechnologyMagazineGizmag Emerging Technology Magazine

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Google cloud runs thousands of protein simulations simultaneously

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The histamine receptor, a GPCR targeted by antihistamines that many are uncomfortably familiar with.
NIH

We know how to get snapshots of what proteins look like. These static pictures tell us where all the atoms of a protein reside within a crystal, which gives us a sense of their structure and lets us design drugs that fit neatly within that structure, altering its activity.

But, in actual cells, proteins are nothing like the static, rigid structures found in crystals. Instead they writhe, buffeted by Brownian motion and constantly shifting among similar energy states. Until we develop a microscope that can resolve all this motion, the best we can do is to run molecular simulations on our computers. Unfortunately, most proteins have a lot of atoms to keep track of, which makes those simulations extremely computationally expensive.

Now, some researchers have figured out how to run the simulations on Google’s cloud computing architecture. Although each of the individual simulations is short, they can be aggregated to provide a picture of long-term behavior. And, with this method of aggregating them in place, the system should be able to work with just about any cloud service available.

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NSA’s broken Dual_EC random number generator has a “fatal bug” in OpenSSL

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If a fatal flaw afflicts a critical cryptographic function used by no one, what are open-source developers to do? Until recently, such a predicament might have been regarded as a mere philosophical thought experiment, but no more.

An advisory published Thursday warns that a “FIPS module” of the widely used OpenSSL library contained a “fatal bug” in its implementation of Dual EC_DRBG. Credible doubts about the trustworthiness of the deterministic random bit generator surfaced almost immediately after National Security Agency (NSA) officials shepherded it through an international standards body in 2006. In September, those fears were rekindled when The New York Times reported the algorithm may contain an NSA-engineered backdoor that makes it easier for government spies to decode encrypted communications.

The fatal Dual EC_DRBG bug resides in the FIPS Object Module v2.0, an optional OpenSSL library used to build crypto apps that are certified by the US government’s Federal Information Processing Standards. When using the module’s implementation of Dual EC_DRBG, the application crashes and can’t be recovered. That’s an amazing discovery for an application that had to undergo countless hours of testing to be certified by the government of the world’s most powerful country. The silver lining seems to be that there’s evidence no one has ever actually used Dual EC_DRBG in release versions of the OpenSSL module (though that in turn raises the question of why RSA’s BSAFE crypto tool used the RNG by default).

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